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To celebrate the holiday season and NYC Transit's 100th Anniversary, we are running special vintage trains every weekend from Thanksgiving through December 19. Six vintage trains from the New York Transit Museum will run on the N line between 57 St and Whitehall St.

Vintage trains will also run on various lines in Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx. See schedule below:

                Queens

Nov 27/28, 10 AM to 5 PM. Vintage trains run on 7 line between Main St and 42 St.

Brooklyn

Dec 4/5, 10 AM to 5 PM. Vintage trains run on 4 line between Utica Av and Grand Central Station.

Bronx

Dec 11/12, 10 AM to 5 PM. Vintage trains run on 2 line between East 180 St and Times Sq.

Manhattan

Dec 18/19, 10 AM to 5 PM. Vintage trains run on Grand Central S Shuttle between Grand Central and Times Sq.


The New York Transit Museum's 3rd Annual

Grand Central
Holiday Train Show

 

Opened November 22 and runs through January 17

 A Delightful Holiday Treat

For Train Buffs and Children of All Ages

View a working model train layout with MTA New York City subway trains and commuter railroads operating on several levels and including NYC landmarks such as Grand Central Terminal and

The Chrysler Building

To commemorate the Subway Centennial, the show also includes an extensive display of models of historic and contemporary subway cars.

Sponsored by M.T.H. Electric Trains

 With additional support from MasterCard(r) International

FREE ADMISSION

New York Transit Museum Gallery Annex and Store

Grand Central Terminal

Off the Main Concourse, in the Shuttle Passage

next to the Station Master's Office

 

Monday - Friday 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Closed major holidays

 

Note: MTA employees receive 20% off on Museum store purchases,
 excluding MetroCards and limited edition merchandise.

METRO-NORTH'S FAREWELL TO THE ACMU FANTRIP: On December 5 MTA Metro-North's "Farewell to the ACMU Trip", will depart New York City's Grand Central Terminal at 9:30 AM. Metro-North's soon to be retired, former New York Central 1100-series MU cars will run on all three of Metro-North's divisions out of GCT, including a rare mileage trip to Mount Vernon East on the New Haven Line. After operating on the New Haven and Harlem Lines (to North White Plains), the train will return to GCT where riders will have time to disembark and buy lunch at any of the many restaurants in and around Grand Central. Then the train will depart for the Hudson Line to Croton-Harmon. Trip includes photo opportunities at Mount Vernon East, Ardsley and Philipse Manor, a runby at Bronxville on the Harlem Line, and will also operate thru Metro-North's new Highbridge Car Appearance Facility on the Hudson Line. Fare includes a commemorative ticket, and an official souvenir brochure. Tickets by reservation only. Fare: $50.00; children under 12 are $25. For tickets and information: Metro-North Group Travel, 420 Lexington Avenue, 9th Fl, New York, NY 10017. Telephone: 212-499-4398, or e-mail GroupSales@Metro-North.org" (MTA Metro-North Railroad - posted 10/12)


718-694-1600

New York City Subway System Rolls into its 100th Birthday!

New Punch Out Book Commemorates the Centennial

 

New York, NY— December 8, 2003 —The New York City Subway System turns 100 in 2004! As a tribute to the icon of the underground, the New York Transit Museum has compiled renditions of twelve historic subway cars for an exclusive punch out book for kids of all ages. Printed on full-color heavy laminated matte paper, New York City Subway Trains (Gibbs Smith, Publisher, $16.95, 48 pp, 12 punch out subway train cars, 8 ½ x 12 ¾ in, ISBN: 1-58685-324-4, October 2003) is a fun and factual homage to America’s first underground transit system.

 

Although it is difficult to picture a time when the New York City Subway System was not an integral part of the city’s legendary non-stop flow, New Yorkers had, in fact, just fallen off the turnip cart and other horse-drawn modes of transportation when they made their way through the clogged, crowded, smelly streets to wait in line for the city’s original subway on October 27, 1904. Passengers paid 5 cents to ride in the first subway cars and New York City Subway Trains documents the intricacies of these cars and subsequent models with historical fact and colorful, easy-to-assemble keepsake trains. The book’s examples of history on wheels include subway train favorites:

 

q       The “Gibbs Cars,” the first all-steel passenger car

q       Car No. 5655, an innovative design which transported visitors to the futuristic 1939-40             World’s Fair

q       The 1950 R-15, with a “new” rounded roof and porthole windows

q       Car No. 9306, painted blue and white, which carried millions of passengers to the 1964-65 World’s Fair

 

The New York Transit Museum is home to more than 100 years of transit lore and memorabilia. The museum’s central facility is housed in an authentic 1930’s subway station in Brooklyn Heights.

 

Founded in 1969, Gibbs Smith, Publisher specializes in books on design and architecture, and also features titles from categories including western, holiday cooking, inspiration and children’s (featuring the celebrated Sierra Club Books for Children series). Gibbs Smith, Publisher offers several other New York titles including Lost New York in Old Postcards, The Architectural Guidebook to New York City and children’s activity books including My Vacation Album and American Grub.

###

Molly Douma
Publicity Associate
Gibbs Smith, Publisher
801-927-2143


TOP 15 REASONS RAIL FANNING IS BETTER THAN DEER HUNTING
15. Kids don't cry BAMBI when you bring a "trophy" home.
14. Wife wouldn't object too much to have "trophy shot" over dining room table.
13. No taxidermist fee for "mounting" your best trophy shot.
12. Trains can be shot all year long.
11. A warm car beats a tree stand any day.
10. Train lovers don't get mad at you for shooting "Thomas The Tank Engine".
9. You can't use a scanner to tell when deer are getting close.
8. No arguments when two people shoot the same train at the same time.
7. No boring Deer Hunting stories.
6. Nobody cares if you use a railroad crossing sign to "sight in" your camera.
5. Three words: "Hunting License Fee".
4. SD90MAC's don't need to be field dressed.
3. Working models of deer? Yeah, right.
2. There's no limit on how many trains you're allowed to shoot.
1. Unless they're really dumb, your buddies won't mistake you for The Southwest Chief.


On October 10th, 2002, Peter S. Kalikow, Chairman of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority,  announced a restructuring of the Authority, designed to further improve services to its customers.  The initiative, with the most sweeping changes in the Authority’s 37-year history, will result in the merging of various umbrella agencies into five distinct companies under the MTA; each with a single transportation mission.

The restructuring, which will begin immediately and be phased in over a two-year period, will result in the creation of the following companies:

·        MTA Rail Road, formerly Long Island Rail Road and Metro-North Railroad

·        MTA Subways, which will include NYC Transit (subways) and Staten Island Railway

·        MTA Bus, formerly Long Island Bus, MaBTSOA, and NYC Transit (buses)

·        MTA Capital, in charge of overseeing system expansion projects for all MTA companies

·        MTA Bridges and Tunnels

MTA Rail Road

The MTA currently oversees two separate rail companies, the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) and Metro-North (MNR), each serving a different metropolitan region.  The LIRR, created in 1834 and part of the MTA since 1968, provides service between Manhattan, Nassau and Suffolk counties, as well as parts of Brooklyn and Queens.  It transports 277,200 riders each weekday, up from 259,200 in 1995.

MNR, formerly Conrail, joined the MTA in 1976, and services seven New York and two Connecticut counties.  MNR transports 252,600 riders each weekday, up from 217,400 riders in 1995.

“Merging the two railroad managements into a single structure will help create a more efficient railroad; one with a broader regional focus,” Mr. Kalikow said.  “The stabilization and expansion of the region’s economy requires a regional approach to the provision of commuter rail services and the new MTA Rail Road will provide that focus well in to the 21st century.”

“The merge will also help streamline administrative services and result in a more uniformed implementation of inventory, equipment, maintenance, and customer strategies,” he added.

MTA Subway

NYC Transit currently operates the most extensive and largest subway system in the nation, with 660 track miles and an estimated fleet of 6,000 subway cars.  Since 1996, annual subway ridership has climbed from 1.13 billion passengers to more than 1.4 billion due to the elimination of the two-fare zone, introduction of the MetroCard and new discount policies which reduced the average cost of a subway fare from $1.32 in 1997 to $1.06 today.  The system’s aging subway fleet was also replaced with state-of-the-art computerized cars that provide riders with a better quality and more efficient ride.

“The renaissance of the system, from a run down, inefficient and unsafe system, to one which has received national recognition for the most improved transit system among the largest systems in the country, is nothing short of remarkable and is a tribute to those who run the system day in and day out,” Mr. Kalikow said.  “It is that spectacular record of accomplishments that we expect to maintain and build under the new plan.”

MTA Subways will operate the New York City subway system and the Staten Island Railway, which currently serves 14,000 Staten Islanders each day.  The Staten Island system covers 14.3 miles of track and has 64 cars.

MTA Bus

The MTA currently provides bus services in the metropolitan region through Long Island Bus in Nassau County with 333 buses, and MTA NYC Transit with 4,700 buses in its two separate bus divisions, one for Manhattan and the Bronx, and another for Brooklyn, Staten Island, and parts of Queens.

            “Surface transportation is a critical aspect of the provisions of public transit for many metropolitan residents, and as such, the MTA is embarking on the creation of a single MTA Bus entity designed to bring these disparate functions under one corporate entity,” Mr. Kalikow said.

“NYC Transit has experienced a 43 percent increase in bus ridership since 1995,” Ms. Lapp said.  “The MTA needs to meet this demand by creating one corporate entity with a mission to develop system-wide bus routing for all MTA customers regardless of jurisdictional boundaries.  The new MTA Bus will also concentrate on developing enhanced services in order to improve the quality of the ride for all passengers.”

Once the newly merged Bus company is established, consideration will be given to having non-MTA transportation providers, including private bus companies that operate in New York City and throughout the MTA service region, join the MTA.  These changes would require the agreement of both the MTA and local governments where the non-MTA providers operate.

MTA Capital

Over the next two years, the MTA plans an extraordinary program of system-wide expansion.  East Side Access will bring the LIRR into Grand Central Terminal, the Second Avenue Subway will extend from Harlem to the Financial District in downtown Manhattan, and the extension of the No. 7 subway to the West Side will spur development in the area.  Other projects include access to Penn Station by Metro-North, and studies are currently being conducted to analyze commuter rail access to Lower Manhattan.  A president, whose mission will be to advance these projects, will head the new MTA Capital company.

“Moving any one of these projects forward would be challenging but moving forward simultaneously while handling the already existing $17 billion capital improvement program presents even greater challenges,” Mr. Kalikow said.  “The new MTA Capital company will provide a single point of focus to allow us to advance system expansion with a coordinated approach that tells New Yorkers we are serious about getting the job done, on time and within budget.”

MTA Capital

Over the next two years, the MTA plans an extraordinary program of system-wide expansion.  East Side Access will bring the LIRR into Grand Central Terminal, the Second Avenue Subway will extend from Harlem to the Financial District in downtown Manhattan, and the extension of the No. 7 subway to the West Side will spur development in the area.  Other projects include access to Penn Station by Metro-North, and studies are currently being conducted to analyze commuter rail access to Lower Manhattan.  A president, whose mission will be to advance these projects, will head the new MTA Capital company.

“Moving any one of these projects forward would be challenging but moving forward simultaneously while handling the already existing $17 billion capital improvement program presents even greater challenges,” Mr. Kalikow said.  “The new MTA Capital company will provide a single point of focus to allow us to advance system expansion with a coordinated approach that tells New Yorkers we are serious about getting the job done, on time and within budget.”

MTA Bridges and Tunnels

MTA Bridges and Tunnels currently operate seven bridges and two passenger car tunnels that are used by 293 million vehicles each year.  The successful implementation of E-ZPAss has allowed Bridges and Tunnels to reduce waiting time for E-ZPass customers by more than 50 percent, with non E-ZPass customers experiencing delays ranging from on to six minutes per vehicle.  The MTA Bridges and Tunnels authority will retain its current corporate structure.

If you have any transit related announcements, please send them to Motorinstructor@yahoo.com.


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Subway Web News 2005